Avoiding the common form 1040 mistakes



MONEY MATTERS

No one wants to delay their federal tax refund. As you certainly don’t, filling out your 1040 form correctly is essential. To that end, it is worth noting some of the common 1040 mistakes – the little slip-ups that aggravate both the IRS and the taxpayer.

Not signing your return. If you file online (and who doesn’t), you have to type your name on the “Your Signature” line in the “Sign Here” section, along with your spouse’s name if you file jointly. If you still file a hard-copy return, you’ve got to sign your name on the “Your Signature” line, and the same goes for your spouse on the “Spouse’s signature” line. No valid signature equals an invalid return.

Not getting your name right. Believe or not, some people mistype their names as they e-file. More commonly, they enter an old name – a maiden name, for example – that doesn’t match the name linked to this taxpayer identification number. If you’ve changed your name, the Social Security Administration (and other federal agencies, as applicable) need to know that.

Missing the filing deadline(s) applicable to you or your business. Is your company an S corp? That means you will probably need to file a Form 1120S by March 15. Is it a sole proprietorship? That means you have until April 15 to file a Form 1040C. If you are new to making estimated tax payments, you have hopefully pored over Form 1040-ES with a tax professional to figure out how much tax is due by each quarterly payment period.

Turning in Form 4868 (the “extension”) gives you until October 15 to file, although any federal taxes owed must still be paid by April 15. If you are a servicemember on duty outside the U.S. and Puerto Rico, you have until June 15 to file your return and pay taxes, and you can also use Form 4868 to file as late as October 15.

If you file late (that is, you submit your return after April 15 without using Form 4868 to request an extension), you face a penalty – a 5% penalty per month following the return’s due date, capping out at a 25% maximum penalty after five months. The penalty for unpaid taxes is .5% per month after the April 15 deadline, and 6% interest a year. If you have taxes a year overdue, you will be assessed both the monthly and yearly penalties.

Making numerical errors. Even with some of the great tax prep software now available, math errors still happen. In fact, they happen largely because people don’t use the software: the taxpayers who insist on filing paper returns are 20 times more likely to commit math mistakes than those who e-file, the IRS reports.

Selecting the wrong filing status. This happens a lot with divorced moms and dads. To determine if they should check the “head of household” box or the “single” box, they should take the online interview at irs.gov/uac/What-is-My-Filing-Status%3F.

Claiming employees as independent contractors. Some small business owners try to save money by doing this, but the IRS may disagree with such claims. If so, the business can end up on the hook for employment taxes related to that employee.

- Money Matters is provided courtesy of Hernandez Financial, Jesse Hernandez Jr., Financial Advisor.



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