Sunnyside lawmaker leads effort in honoring Civil Air Patrol

Among those honored during a ceremony last week in Olympia was Richard Hagmann of Spokane (in front with wife Martha), one of the surviving founding members of the Civil Air Patrol. Pictured in the back from left are Hagmann’s daughter-in-law, Linda Hudson, son Tom Hudson, Lt. Col. And Sen. Jim Honeyford, Col. James P. Furlong of the Civil Air Patrol and Hagmann’s son, David Hudson.

photo courtesy Washington State Senate
Among those honored during a ceremony last week in Olympia was Richard Hagmann of Spokane (in front with wife Martha), one of the surviving founding members of the Civil Air Patrol. Pictured in the back from left are Hagmann’s daughter-in-law, Linda Hudson, son Tom Hudson, Lt. Col. And Sen. Jim Honeyford, Col. James P. Furlong of the Civil Air Patrol and Hagmann’s son, David Hudson.



OLYMPIA – An open door at his Olympia office led to Sen. Jim Honeyford joining the Civil Air Patrol nearly a decade ago.

Last week, the Sunnyside Republican was at the forefront in recognizing the patrol’s service during a special brunch at the state capitol.

The State Senate ceremony honored the Washington citizens who were among the first to join the Civil Air Patrol back in 1941.

Among those in attendance were two of the patrol’s original members, Richard Hagmann, 91, of Spokane, and Warren Davis, 94, of Seattle. The families of two deceased original members, Lt. James Campbell and Master Sgt. Gordon Ebbert, also attended the ceremony.

Honeyford, a lieutenant colonel with the Civil Air Patrol’s legislative and Yakima squadrons, said he joined the patrol nearly 10 years ago.

“My door was standing open and someone asked me if I was interested in joining the Civil Air Patrol,” Honeyford recalled. “I kind of always liked flying…so they gave me an application.”

At age 76, Honeyford today is likely one of the oldest active Civil Air Patrol members in this state. When possible he attends trainings every Monday night at the Yakima Armory.

He says the training includes aerial photography, CPR, map reading skills and radio communication.

That background served Honeyford well last summer when he photographed Wanapum Dam from a plane for the state’s Department of Ecology.

The effort was part of the state’s response to the discovery of a crack at the dam that required lowering water levels.

The Civil Air Patrol was also active in responding to last year’s mudslide at Oso, delivering supplies to remote areas and helping evacuation efforts.

The patrol’s founding members received a Congressional Gold Medal last December in recognition of their role in protecting the nation’s coast against enemy submarine attacks during World War II.

Honeyford wanted to make sure Washington state also honored their service.

“Each year, my colleagues and I recognize the service of those in the Civil Air Patrol,” said Honeyford. “Although the founding members of the Civil Air Patrol were honored by Congress as a group late last year, I wanted to make sure we thanked them personally for their service.”

Honeyford, who has soloed as a student pilot, said those original members risked life and limb to protect the home front during World War II.

He says they deserve more than a pat on the back.

“I’m glad I can be a small part of telling them, ‘thanks for your sacrifice’.”

Honeyford added, “Their efforts were not really well publicized. They weren’t military, but they were extraordinary people who did an extraordinary job.”



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