Fair to get break: less than 90°

Windy Negrete judges a Silver Fox rabbit raised by Amarisah Osborn, 16, of Sunnyside for classification at the Yakima Valley Fair and Rodeo on Wednesday morning. Osborn is a member of Desert Valley 4-H.

Photo by Jennie McGhan
Windy Negrete judges a Silver Fox rabbit raised by Amarisah Osborn, 16, of Sunnyside for classification at the Yakima Valley Fair and Rodeo on Wednesday morning. Osborn is a member of Desert Valley 4-H.



Organizers of the Yakima Valley Fair and Rodeo, underway at Grandview’s Country Fair Park have to be hoping the weather services are correct about tomorrow’s weather. They are predicting a high temperature between 84-88 degrees.

That would give the fair its lone day with a high temperature below 100 degrees. The weather services have been right so far, predicting these 100-degree days.

“It’s really hot,” said Jake VanPelt, member of the Yakima Valley Fair and Rodeo Foundation board.

He sat and chatted with the Foundation board and Fair board Willard Mears in the horticulture building, where the could avoid the already high temperature Wednesday at mid-morning. The Fair had already made the decision to cancel the (horse) team pull scheduled for Thursday, which was forecast for anywhere between 106-113 degrees.

“They were concerned for the safety of the horses,” Mears said.

The results of the hot weather have been disappointing, to organizers and fans of the fair. Except for the people participating in the fair, there has been little audience. The midway of food, merchandise and informational booths, were like a ghost town on Wednesday.

Fair organizers didn’t have much to do Wednesday except sit and visit while waiting for the weather to change. Fair participants, especially those showing farm animals, did what they came to do. Farms kids mostly, they know that farmers must deal with whatever mother nature throws to them.

While Mears and VanPelt, the three judges for the competitive entries in the horticulture building went about there their business in relative solitude.

So, Saturday is the day everyone is counting on. Hopefully, for the organizers, the Lower Valley Community will come out. The horticulture building alone is a pleasurable sight. The color and schemes of the 4-H and FFA displays will please the eye.

There are still several events for the public to enjoy Saturday. Livestock judging will begin at 9 a.m. The car show will open at 10 a.m. There will be tractor driving contests at 2 p.m., and the car show awards will be made 3 p.m.

The FFA and 4-H livestock trophy presentations will take place at 4 p.m. The ProWest tour rodeo will get under way at 7:30 p.m. The mud football and mud volley ball contests will begin at the conclusion of the rodeo.



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