Auditions for musical tonight

Left to right, members of the backstage crew are Tom Stegeman, Terry Langley, Lois Olson, Karen Santos, Barb Wells, Sheila Hazzard and Marlaine Mars.


Left to right, members of the backstage crew are Tom Stegeman, Terry Langley, Lois Olson, Karen Santos, Barb Wells, Sheila Hazzard and Marlaine Mars.



— If you are 45 years or older and can still handle the musical comedy stage, Over the Hill Theatricals would like to get a good measure of your talents tonight, July 10. Auditions started yesterday and last call is tonight at 7 p.m.

Those are the dates for auditions for “All Aboard for Broadway,” an All-American musical comedy by George M. Cohan, one of the brightest stars of Broadway’s brilliant past. You will need to act, sing and dance for this one.

Songs from this musical include “Mary’s a Grand Old Name,” “Harrigan,” “Give My Regards to Broadway,” “Over There,” and “I’m a Yankee Doodle Dandy.”

Already set for the play are the production and backstage crews. Sheila Hazzard and Barb Wells will produce the show, which is set for September performances at the Sunnyside High School auditorium.

Auditions and rehearsals will take place from 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 1106 Taylor St. Registration will begin at 6:30 p.m.

The directors will be Julie Trumble and Dee Howe. Krsti Tuor will be music director, and the choreographer will be Marlaine Mars.

Accompanists will be Lois Olson and Dana Clark. Sheila Hazzard and Tom Stegeman will design and construct sets, and the set manager will be Mark Cummings.

Stage manager will be Barb Wells, and Vicki Juzeler will be props manager. Costume managers will be Susan Webber and Betty Minnich.

House manager and tickets will be the responsibility of Pat and Melissa Walsh. Advertising managers will be Lloyd Hazzard and Kathy Viereck. Hair and makeup specialist and programs manager still need to be filled.

The story is set in 1917 New York City. Florence Zweibach is putting on Broadway Show, and lots of hopeful young women are flocking to the auditions. On her way, Mary Conklin, a sweet budding ingenue, meets Harry Harrigan, a down-and-out Tin Pan Alley tunesmith.

Harry has never made a dime with his music, and he owes some lone shark women $200 for his piano. Harry escapes them by going off to fight World War I. He departs with Mary holding a portfolio of music and a dream of what might have been.

A show in which Mary is involved “Yankees Away,” is flopping until Mary pulls out a song Harry wrote. The resulting new show, “Grand Ol’ Flag,” is a smash hit. Wounded, Harry returns from the war to discover he has become a star.



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