Customers of utility to see smaller bills temporarily

— Pacific Power's residential customers in Washington — about 107,000 in all — will be seeing a modest decrease in their bills for 10 months starting April 1, if a filing made March 6 is approved by the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission.

The credit, based on usage, would be a decrease of 1.6 percent or about $2.35 a month for an average residential customer using 1,200 kilowatt hours a month.

The commission will examine Pacific Power's filing and determine if it should be accepted as filed, modified, or rejected. If accepted as filed, the rate reduction would go into effect on April 1, 2018.

The proposed credit traces back to September 2016 when the commission approved Pacific Power's proposal to implement a decoupling mechanism for its residential customers and most other customer groups.

A decoupling mechanism allows an annual "true up" for Pacific Power's revenue based on its energy sales. These annual true ups help energy companies remove disincentives to cost-effective conservation and energy efficiency measures. Rates may go up or down based on the differences between projected loads and revenues.

The utility submitted its rate adjustment filing Dec. 1, 2017 and has now updated its results, which will produce a credit for residential customers and a small surcharge for irrigation customers.

The proposed price change for irrigation customers represents a 3.5 percent increase. An average irrigation customer using approximately 4,000 kilowatt-hours per month would see a bill impact of $12.60 per month. Pacific Power serves about 5,000 irrigation customers in the state.



Comments

Comments are subject to moderator review and may not appear immediately on the site.

Please read our commenting policy before posting.

Any comment violating the site's commenting guidelines will be removed and the user could be banned from the site.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment