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Murals brighten our city

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Photo by Laura Gjovaag

This jam piece by three different artists graces the wall of VIP Auto Salon on the corner of Edison Avenue and Seventh Street. According to the owner of the shop, the goal of the piece was to brighten up downtown.

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Photo by Laura Gjovaag

Some murals celebrate events, like the Seahawks Super Bowl Championship mural on the corner of Decatur Avenue and Seventh Street on the wall of Electric Beach. Sunnyside also boasts a Seahawks themed house near the corner of 15th Street and Edison Avenue.

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Photo by Laura Gjovaag

Alvarez Day Care on Eighth Street and Decatur Avenue features a playful sea serpent mural that serves to brighten the neighborhood as well as attract business.

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Photo by Laura Gjovaag

One of the older murals in Sunnyside is the sun-faded image of paradise on Franklin Avenue near Fifth Street. It was painted in 1996. Sunnyside may not have an active annual mural painting event like Toppenish, but the city still has many murals.

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Photo by Laura Gjovaag

This new mural near the corner of 13th Street and Yakima Valley Highway depicts an epic battle between a panda and octopus. The mural graces the side of El Pollo Loco Los Pandas, a Mexican restaurant.

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Photo by Laura Gjovaag

The purpose of the mural at El Pollo Loco Los Pandas is written on the wall: “Brighten Our City!” A variety of murals grace numerous walls in Sunnyside, including a Grizzly on the side of Sunnyside High School. A mural of firemen that was removed during the fire station remodel will also be put back up when a place is found for it.

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Photo by Laura Gjovaag

Some murals have specific purposes, like this mustachioed barber at the corner of Franklin Avenue and Fifth Street. The artwork lets people know a haircut can be had inside.

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Photo by Laura Gjovaag

Murals also can depict the past, like this traditional image of Ben Snipes and a cowboy painted on the former $ave-on-Food$ store at the corner of Sixth Street and Yakima Valley Highway. It was created in June 1995 by Toppenish native Gary Kerby.

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Photo by Laura Gjovaag

TW Market, at the corner of Tacoma and Harrison avenues, has a childlike mural along its back wall, facing Harrison Avenue.

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